College graduation is a major accomplishment (congratulations!)—but it can also be a major source of stress. What do you do when your degree is done? A little planning and some solid research can keep your life moving forward and help you maintain that positive attitude. Whether you want to join the workforce posthaste or are considering grad school, there are still things to think about and decisions to make before taking your next step. Here are five tips to ease the tension and ensure that the next move is the right one for you.

  1. Take a short mental health break. Give yourself a little time to unwind and enjoy your freedom. You have the rest of your life to work, don’t rush into the first “opportunity” that may not be a great fit for you. That said, taking a few weeks off after classes are over is fine, but sooner or later those bills will begin to pile up and it will be time to start repaying that student loan. So, take a break but keep your eye on the ball.

  2. Stay in touch.  College friends, professors and roommates are a great jumping off point for the networking to come. Remember that the saying, “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know” rings truer today than ever before. When you are ready to venture out, networking will be much easier with a full social contact list.

  3. Build your skillset. In today’s digital world, keeping on top of trends in technology is crucial. Check out webinars and podcasts, take an online course or, perhaps even better, intern at a local business in an industry of interest to you where you can learn while you earn a paycheck.

  4. Be flexible. Considering the current unemployment and underemployment rate even among college graduates, you may have to get creative. Put your entrepreneurial self forward. Leverage your hidden talents into a lucrative business. If you like to make jewelry or art or have a closet full of gently used but still in-vogue clothes, take to the internet and sell your wares. Chances are, what’s in your closet may be exactly what someone out there is looking for.

  5. Figure out where you’re going to live. Consolidate and downsize your stuff for more options and a more manageable transition. Current research shows that the average studio apartment in New York City ranges from 550 to 700 square feet. The good news is there are many innovative ways to make even the smallest spaces both decorative and functional.

Whether you wind up renting a place of your own—or need to stay in your childhood bedroom for a while—chances are, you’re going to need to store some of your most prized possessions from your college years somewhere. For the perfect sized storage unit to meet your needs, contact the experts at Gotham Mini Storage.